Archive for October, 2015

Salvere Blog: What If…

October 28, 2015

by Salvere Health and Fitness

We looked in the mirror and actually complemented ourselves instead of picking apart things we did not like?

We smiled and said hello to strangers instead of dropping our heads to avoid eye contact?

We practiced intentional acts of kindness instead of talking about what someone did not do for us?

We thought of mistakes as learning opportunities instead of punishing ourselves?

what if hokey pokey quote

We took the opportunity to learn why someone thinks differently rather than speaking negatively about their opinion?

We accepted the fact that there’s more than one way to think and feel about an issue instead of calling them names?

We appreciated that people have passion about books, music, art and religion instead of making fun?

We expressed interest in other people by asking questions instead of spending time on our electronic devices?

We complimented people for something other than their external appearance?

by Lisa Martin, owner and personal trainer at Salvere Health and Fitness. If you’d like to contact Lisa, email her at Lisa@SalvereHealthAndFitness.com or call her at (410) 707-0055.
We welcome your thoughts and ideas!  Thank you for reading and taking the steps to become a healthier YOU.
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Salvere Recipe: Crock Pot Pork with Apples and Onions

October 23, 2015
by Salvere Health and Fitness
Fall and apples go together like peas and carrots! Okay, maybe fall and apples are a little better then peas and carrots. Look for ways to incorporate apples into your meals. Make a homemade applesauce, roast for a salad or a dessert, add to soups… So many options!  And then, the crock pot — Throw everything in and go. Come home and, viola, dinner!

When choosing an apple for cooking, look for different apples and their specific characteristics. I don’t know about you but if I’m eating an apple with peanut butter (the best food ever!) for a snack, I like a good crispy apple. Those mealy, mushy ones — not so much. However, these may work great in cooking!  Also, depending on what type of flavor you want, don’t be afraid to mix tart and sweet apples.

Crock Pot Pork with Apples and Onions

about 3.5 lb pork shoulder or butt, trimmed of fat layer
1 large onion, quartered
4 cloves of garlic, sliced
2 apples, peeled and quartered
1-2 jalapenos, diced (optional)
1 cup apple cider
1/4 cup apple cider vinegar
1/4 cup brown sugar or honey
2 tsp sea salt
2 tsp black pepper

Place onions, garlic, jalapenos and apples in the bottom of the crock pot. Place the pork on top. Mix together the apple cider, vinegar, sugar, salt and pepper.  Pour on top.  Turn crock pot to low and cook 8ish hours. Once done, remove the pork. It should shred fairly easily. If you have time, let the juices cool and skim off the fat. If not, pour off as much as you can while hot. Spoon the crock pot contents (including the onions and apples, etc.) into a blender and puree. You may not need all of it but use your judgement!  Pour it back into the pot and add shredded pork. Mix and enjoy!

This WILL freeze fairly well too!!!

by Lisa Martin, owner and personal trainer at Salvere Health and Fitness. If you’d like to contact Lisa, email her at Lisa@SalvereHealthAndFitness.com or call her at (410) 707-0055.

Salvere Blog: Sometimes it’s the Little Things

October 21, 2015

by Salvere Health and Fitness

Ever read the ingredient list on the back of the food label and thought “what the heck is that”? Maybe you recognize the first several ingredients but then comes that list of Thiamine Mononitrate, Trisodium Phosphate, Carrageenan, Titanium Dioxide, Phenylalanine, etc. Forget identifying these things when simply pronouncing these words becomes a challenge. Many of these food additives help to preserve the food or make it look and taste more appealing.

When it comes to food additives, we need to pay a little more attention especially if you consume a diet high in processed or packaged foods. Many of these additives need more research but, regardless, the best research happens when we each pay more attention to how our own bodies respond. While these ingredients could be lengthy discussions by themselves, we wanted to at least define a few of them for you.  This blog is a little longer then our usual so bear with us!

Carrageenan: “a nondigestable polysaccharide extracted from red edible seaweed.” Makes sense now, huh? Okay, so you will see this in many of your non dairy milk alternatives such as almond and coconut milk. It acts as a thickener and stabilizer in foods. Now, carrageenan can be found in a food grade form and non food grade form. Some research shows it can cause inflammation and irritate individuals with GI issues such as IBS and Crohns.

Titanium dioxide: “the naturally occurring oxide of titanium.” Again, this sure clears things up! In food, this additive makes things look more white. Think skim milk and powdered sugar on donuts. You will also see this in cosmetics such as sunscreen and lotions. This too has been show to possibly irritate the GI tract and negatively impact individuals with IBS and  Crohns.

Chicory root: “a woody, perennial plant usually with bright blue flowers.” Pretty easy to understand this one. Both the root and flowers/petals can be consumed. Often you will see this ground and used as a coffee substitute. Additionally, you’ll see it in foods, possibly listed as chicory root fiber/inulin/extract, that promote fiber content such as the high fiber bars, cereals and breads. Some people do well with his particular ingredient and for others, it’s not really your friend!

Soy lecithin: “an oily substance extracted from soybeans chemically (using hexane) or mechanically, it is a byproduct of soybean oil production.” Check out the back of any processed food in your pantry and chances are pretty good you’ll find Soy Lecithin. Companies use this product as an emulsifier in foods such as chocolate and salad dressings. It keeps the oil and other stuff from separating. And it can be found quite cheap in the US as the government often subsidizes soy crops. Issues may arise in some people with soy allergies, although uncommon.

Sorbitol: “a sugar alcohol with a sweet tastes that the body metabolizes slowly.” You’ll see this in chewing gum and diet food products. It’s also used as a laxative. This again is one of those products that can cause bloating and other GI “disturbances. In cases of health issues such as IBS and Crohns this additive may cause irritation and flare ups.

Xanthan gum: “a substance produced by the fermentation of Xanthomonas Camestris.” Huh??  Its basically taking a substance that forms as a result of fermentation and processing it into a powder that works great to help those herbs stay suspended in your salad dressing and keeping your ice cream creamy! Some people do have allergies to Xanthan gum and it to can contribute to GI discomfort.

Guar gum: “the ground endosperm of guar beans.” Basically they take the guar seeds, remove the husks, mill them then screen them to leave a white powdery substance that is guar gum. Use guar gum as you would corn starch. Check you soup, salad dressing and condiment labels to find this ingredient. Guar gum is a soluble fiber so it will aid in digestion and elimination by helping to create bulk. It was once used as a weight loss pill.

by Lisa Martin, owner and personal trainer at Salvere Health and Fitness. If you’d like to contact Lisa, email her at Lisa@SalvereHealthAndFitness.com or call her at (410) 707-0055.

We welcome your thoughts and ideas!  Thank you for reading and taking the steps to become a healthier YOU.

Salvere Recipe: Roasted Winter Squash Soup

October 17, 2015

by Salvere Health and Fitness

Oh, fall!  What a wonderful time of year and it’s been beautiful so far with the crisp mornings and colorful trees. This time of year is also perfect for soups. This soup pairs nicely with a variety of different meal options.

In this recipe, roast troasted acorn squashhe squash before putting it in the soup. Roasting brings out a much different flavor then simply boiling. Plus, have you ever tried peeling an acorn squash raw??  It’s a true exercise in patience and knife skills — Also, the combination of acorn and butternut squash provide something unique! Feel free to try your own combination of winter squash.

Roasted Winter Squash Soup

squash soup

1 butternut squash, cut in half and seeds removed
1 acorn squash, cut in half and seeds removed
Olive Oil
Sea Salt
Black pepper
3 tbsp butter (ghee or even coconut oil if you prefer!)
1 large onion, diced
4 cloves of garlic, minced
2 granny smith apples, peeled and diced
1-2 jalapenos, diced (optional)
1 tbsp fresh sage, diced
1 tbsp fresh thyme
3 cans (or 42 ounces) of chicken broth (low sodium if you need to be aware of salt intake)

Preheat oven to 400.  Place halved squash in glass dish, drizzle with olive oil, salt and pepper.  Roast 25 minutes or until the squash is fork tender. Remove from oven and let cool.  Once cooled, peel and roughly chop into large cubes.  (You will puree this so they do not have to be uniform or neat!)

In large pot, melt butter or oil over medium heat. Add onions, garlic, apples and jalapenos. Cook until slightly brown and add herbs. Add broth and squash.  Bring to a boil.  Reduce heat and cook about 15 minutes.  Remove from heat and puree — Use an immersion blender right in your pot provided it’s safe for the pot.  Or add to your blender and do it in batches. Enjoy!!!!

by Lisa Martin, owner and personal trainer at Salvere Health and Fitness. If you’d like to contact Lisa, email her at Lisa@SalvereHealthAndFitness.com or call her at (410) 707-0055.

Salvere Blog: The Perfect Workout

October 13, 2015
by Salvere Health and Fitness
Kettlebells, boot camp, barre, Pilates, Bikram yoga, Crossfit, regular yoga, body pump, aerobics, running, etc. You name it, there’s an article about how its the “best workout for weight loss”. Well, what and how can all these different things be the “best”? How do you sift through all this to know what to do?
bosu dumbbells medicine ball
Really, we can’t answer this question for you. Think of all these things as tools in your toolbox that you can pick at different times. When looking at your fitness program (or journey), consider the following things: What do you enjoy doing? Do you struggle with chronic pain? Have you had surgery or injury? If so, was it major (such as knee replacement, back surgery or a heart attack) or minor (such as minor arthroscopic knee surgery)? How long have you been exercising? Have you lifted weights before? When are you most energetic? What type of exercise are you most likely to do regularly?
Remember, these answers will change over time! Keep checking in with yourself and as you progress so too will your fitness program. It’s helpful for your body and to prevent burnout/boredom to continue to make changes instead of just stopping because “it’s not working”. Learn what works for you on those days with lower energy or something flares up — Make a change to your routine that day, don’t just do nothing.
With our blogs, we do our best to not continue to overload you with information but to help you start to examine how you can apply things to YOU. Remember, science is one thing, real life another. Apply this to your fitness and nutrition. We’ve become a society with weight loss tunnel vision when it comes to exercise and eating. Lets work to take these blinders off and pay attention to how we feel. You are unique and something different works for each of us. We constantly change as individuals so allow your fitness and nutrition to ebb and flow with your life.
by Lisa Martin, owner and personal trainer at Salvere Health and Fitness. If you’d like to contact Lisa, email her at Lisa@SalvereHealthAndFitness.com or call her at (410) 707-0055.
We welcome your thoughts and ideas!  Thank you for reading and taking the steps to become a healthier YOU.

Salvere Recipe: Millet Black Bean Salad

October 10, 2015
by Salvere Health and Fitness

Most of us know millet with regard to bird food — While millet is relatively uncommon in the United States, other cultures such as India and Africa use it as a diet staple. Millet falls into the grain category of foods along with rice, quinoa and couscous. It looks tiny and round in shape and cooks much like rice. Try it as a porridge type dish or as a substitute for rice. Millet is naturally gluten free and this recipe makes for a great vegetarian meal. Look for it in your local health food store.

Millet Black Bean Salad

millet

The salad:

  • 1 cup millet
  • 2 cups chicken or vegetable broth
  • 1 tbsp butter or olive oil
  • 2 cups black beans (canned or otherwise already cooked)
  • 2 tomatoes, chopped
  • 1 red pepper, diced
  • 1 cucumber, peeled and diced
  • 1 medium red onion, diced

In medium sauce pan heat butter or oil over medium. Add millet and toast until slightly brown. Add broth and bring to a boil.  Cook, covered for 25-30 minutes until water is absorbed and millet looks fluffy. Let cool.  Add to large bowl with all the remaining ingredients.

 The dressing:

  • 1/3 cup light olive oil
  • 3 tbsp lemon juice
  • 2 tbsp balsamic vinegar
  • 2 tsp minced garlic
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp cumin
  • 1/2 tsp black pepper
  • 1/4 tsp cayenne pepper
  • 2 tbsp cilantro

Mix all the above ingredients well and pour over salad. Chill for several hours or over night.

by Lisa Martin, owner and personal trainer at Salvere Health and Fitness. If you’d like to contact Lisa, email her at Lisa@SalvereHealthAndFitness.com or call her at (410) 707-0055.

Salvere Blog: Doing Tough Things

October 6, 2015

by Salvere Health and Fitness

risk comes reward

How many times does something come up that feels scary, weird, intimidating and/or challenging? Think about how you respond. Do you jump right in and do it? Do you procrastinate and avoid it? Do you talk to someone about it? Do you keep it to yourself?

Tough things appear in our jobs, personal life, relationships, with our health and even families. Often times we look for ways out of the situation and keep our feelings to ourselves. During a recent running event, a situation came up where a few of us had to challenge our fear. Talking about it showed several things — First, often you’re not alone in your struggle. Second, encouragement from someone else means a lot. Third, doing that tough thing comes with great reward at the end (and coyotes will not get you!)!

The more often you challenge yourself to do hard things, the more you realize you’ll be okay when you do!  And that they can be some of the best experiences. Now, go do something TOUGH today, and share it with someone!

by Lisa Martin, owner and personal trainer at Salvere Health and Fitness. If you’d like to contact Lisa, email her at Lisa@SalvereHealthAndFitness.com or call her at (410) 707-0055.
We welcome your thoughts and ideas!  Thank you for reading and taking the steps to become a healthier YOU.

Salvere Recipe: Chocolate Chip Cookies

October 2, 2015

Yes, that is correct — We sent out a recipe for chocolate chip cookies. Two important items when it comes to eating such foods.  First, a cookie is a cookie even if it is gluten free, fat free, sugar free, made with sweet potatoes, etc. The second, learn how to incorporate such things into your “regular healthy eating plan”.  That does not mean eat them daily yet eat them on occasion and enjoy every bite.

This particular recipe uses almond flour for the base instead of white flour made from wheat. In our previous recipe for the scones we discussed the differences in almond flour and almond meal. Remember, with coconut oil, the difference in refined and unrefined? In addition to a higher smoke point, refined tastes less like coconut then unrefined. Use either one in this recipe. We took this recipe directly from the below link:

http://blog.meaningfuleats.com/almond-flour-chocolate-chip-cookies-grain-free/

 Chocolate Chip Cookies

chocolate chip cookies

  • 1/2 cup butter, softened
  • 1/4 cup coconut oil, softened
  • 3/4 cup brown sugar (or coconut sugar)
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 3 cups almond flour
  • 1 1/4 cups chocolate chips of choice (I used dark chocolate chunks from Whole Foods!)
  • 2/3 cup toasted walnuts (optional)

Preheat oven to 350F.

  1. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
  2. In the bowl of a stand mixer, cream together the butter, coconut oil, and brown sugar. Add the vanilla and eggs, mixing until incorporated.
  3. Mix in the baking soda and salt. Add the almond flour, 1 cup at a time, beating well after each addition. Fold in the chocolate chips and walnuts with a wooden spoon.
  4. Form the dough into tablespoon rounds and place on the lined baking sheet about 3 inches apart. Bake for 11-13 minutes, or until golden brown around edges. Cool and enjoy!


by Lisa Martin, owner and personal trainer at Salvere Health and Fitness. If you’d like to contact Lisa, email her at Lisa@SalvereHealthAndFitness.com or call her at (410) 707-0055.